Friday, September 29, 2017

Cookbook author in Australia has book withdrawn over her conduct regarding charities


A blogger in Australia had a cookbook withdrawn after it was revealed she had apparently lied about charitable donations she had made, and apparently was fined.  It isn’t necessarily the case that American law would have treated her conduct the same way. Here’s a typical news story. Amazon has a database entry for the book but says it is "unavailable".

But what was also interesting about the case that the publisher, Penguin, had given her “media training” and then put her on notice about questions concerning her charitable giving.  That’s the first time I’ve heard of this issue coming up between a trade publisher and an author.

However trade publishers are concerned about the “conduct” of their authors.  Simon and Schuster withdrew publishing Milo Yiannopoulos in February (“Dangerous”) after a supposed “scandal”, which I’ve discussed elsewhere (I think the matter was greatly overblown by the media and not based on the real facts).  Milo went on to self-publish the book.


When trust or estate money is invested in media projects (especially independent film), concerns can arise over whether beneficiaries have been properly notified.  

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