Monday, September 16, 2019

John Fish talks about Frank Herbert's "Dune" series and how it plays on audiobooks


From his new apartment in downtown Montreal, John Fish (on gap year from Harvard) talks about “How I Fell Back in Love with Reading”.


It seems odd for someone who makes instructive posts on speedreading and improving rapid comprehension and time management for college students, would also advocate buying audiobooks. Doesn’t listening to them take a long time?
Fish says he listens to them while doing housekeeping chores, which are more in a large apartment than in a dorm room.  He talks especially about Frank Herbert’s “Dune” series, which I seem to have mentioned here Nov. 22, 2009.

I remember reading the first “Dune” book when I was in the Army at Ft. Eustis (I also read “Atlas Shrugged”, and Irving Wallace’s “The Plot” which never became a movie – some of those 60s spy “treasure hunt” novels got away without demanding a lot from their characters and became obsolete.)  The book is long, and described a civilization in a solar system with four habitable planets, including one largely desert that had a lot of addictive “space” and plenty of sandworms that young men rode on as fraternal initiations. Now “Dune” is very long. The series would have to be condensed to be feasible to consume.  (The movie came out in 1984 and the production company named after it still exists and makes other science fiction.) Fish says that the characters are read by different people with inflections that make the characters stick as real people.  I seem to remember a Lady Jessica, a gom jabber weapon, and a holographic globe showing all the planets in their system. Medicine was quite advanced.  I also remember the “guild” where brains could be disembodied and carefully stored and direct space ships as like with living computers.

I’m getting calls from my POD publisher about the slow sales (for so many years?) but I wonder if Audiobooks will be brought up.  
  
I see I covered an earlier video on this of his from Dec. 2018. 

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